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More on Biological vs Artificial Intelligence

John Markoff writes in the science section of the New York Times (7 Apr '16) that computers will not " outstrip human capabilities within many of our lifetimes." He notes that when Alphago, the Go-playing software program designed by Lee Se-dol, defeated the human Go champion, some in Silicon Valley proclaimed it as a precursor of the arrival of genuine thinking machines.

Markoff describes that win as "rooted in recent advances in pattern recognition technologies that have also yielded impressive results in speech recognition, computer vision and machine learning." Markoff writes of warnings about superintelligent machines that might not be favorably "disposed to humanity." That idea, he says, "has been treated more skeptically by neuroscientists and a vast majority of artificial intelligence researchers." He adds:

For starters, biologists acknowledge that the basic mechanisms for biological intelligence are still not completely understood, and as a result there is not a good model of human intelligence for computers to simulate.

Indeed, the field of artificial intelligence has a long history of over-promising and under-delivering.

 

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